McQueen, the King of Controversial Couture, Lives on at the V&A in London

Model wearing a hat that looks like a flock of butterflies

This butterfly headdress, created by milliner Philip Treacy for Alexander McQueen, is now on show at the V&A. Credit: Model Alana Zimmer, © Anthea Simms

Banish the beige, drop the drab, and refuel your fashionista spirit with a visit to “Savage Beauty,” a retrospective of the late Alexander McQueen’s sartorial extremes on display at London’s V&A.

Claire Wilcox, the V&A’s senior Curator of Fashion, has considerably expanded upon the original exhibit at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. For the London show, which continues through August 2, 2015, Wilcox sourced 66 additional pieces and included a new section focusing on McQueen’s early collections.

The result is an extraordinary selection of 240 ensembles dating from 1992 to 2010, displayed over ten themed rooms.

Here are a few “do’s” and “don’t’s” to bear in mind if you’re planning a visit.

Don’t confuse Alexander McQueen with Steve McQueen

Steve was the proto-Daniel Craig, a Hollywood hunk with ice blue eyes and a motorcycle. Alexander was the British bad boy designer who created costumes for David Bowie and worked for Givenchy before founding his own fashion line. Both McQueens, however, had a penchant for leather.

That's Steve on the left, and Alexander on the right. Portrait of Alexander McQueen © Marc Hom/Trunk Archive

That’s Steve on the left, and Alexander on the right. Portrait of Alexander McQueen credit © Marc Hom/Trunk Archive

Do dress for excess

While it’s not obligatory to don studded stilettos and a leather bustier when you visit, if you’ve got the gear, this is your opportunity to flaunt it. You won’t feel out of place amid mannequins sporting fox fur Chewbacca-like sleeves, a swan-inspired feathered cape, animal skulls as shoulder pads, and a hat made of mallard wings and Swarovski-crystal studded eggs. (Not all together, mind you. That would just be tacky).

Mannequins in feathered gowns designed by Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen had a fetish for feathers, working them into elaborate garments and headdresses. Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Don’t be afraid of falling down the rabbit hole

The exhibit begins in a darkened room, where a black and white film projected on a wall shows McQueen’s face transforming into a skull—and it only gets weirder from there.

The Romantic Primitivism room is reminiscent of a crypt. Bones and skulls line the walls and a film of an Ophelia-esque maiden writhes overhead. Keep an eye out for the mannequin with tusks over her mouth and a coat of synthetic hair. (I wouldn’t know whether to take that to the dry cleaner or the beautician).

Mannequins wear fashions incorporating bones and skulls by British designer Alexander McQueen

Bones and skulls set the scene for tribal designs in the Romantic Primitivism gallery. Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Meanwhile, in the Romantic Nationalism section, a bull headdress covers the face of an ominous figure in a billowing red robe, and in the Romantic Gothic room, mannequins are rendered featureless by leather gimp masks. It’s not a fashion choice everyone would make, but it would save hours on hair and make-up.

A matador-like figure in a red robe and jeweled bull mask presides over the Romantic Nationalism gallery at the “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty” exhibit at London’s V&A.

A matador-like figure in a red robe and jeweled bull mask presides over the Romantic Nationalism gallery at the “Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty” exhibit at London’s V&A. Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Do read the captions

Even when you think you’re looking at a design that’s fairly straight forward and accessible, the captions reveal sinister insight. That figure-hugging Victorian-style cutaway jacket, for instance? It featured in McQueen’s 1992 collection “Jack the Ripper Stalks His Victims,” and it’s lined with human hair. Oh, and that chic black pencil skirt? It’s from a 1995 collection entitled “Highland Rape.”

McQueen’s own words provide a flicker of illumination into his darkly troubled mind. “I don’t think like the average person on the street,” he once said, in a fit of uncharacteristic understatement. “I find beauty in the grotesque…I have to force people to look at things.”

Don’t be afraid of ghosts

McQueen employed a 19th century holographic technique called “Pepper’s Ghost” to conjure a spectral Kate Moss, who appeared to float above the catwalk for the finale of his 2006 “The Widows of Culloden” collection. At “Savage Beauty,” the illusion plays out on a loop inside a glass pyramid.

From the darkness, Moss’s figure gradually congeals out of a mist. She swirls around in a white gown before suddenly disappearing in a Tinker Bell-like ball of light. It’s an intriguing illusion, but all I can think about is a forgotten Kleenex in the washing machine.

You can view the illusion here:

Don’t rock up in these styles at airport security

Stepping into The Cabinet of Curiosities is awe-inspiring to the point of intimidating. Stretching two-storeys high and flanked by black-lacquered cubbyholes filled with haute-couture oddities, it’s exactly how you might imagine the walk-in wardrobe of Bellatrix Lestrange, the Death Eater dominatrix from the Harry Potter films.

Some shelves feature full-height mannequins, which slowly rotate as if under a mobilicorpus spell, showcasing outfits from all angles. There’s a red flapper-style gown, a daringly sheer sheath, and a black and red strapless flared feathered dress. Nearly all of the figures’ faces are obscured by masks, whether of leather or lace or the head of an animal.

Catwalk footage from Alexander McQueen’s shows plays in the Cabinet of Curiosities, which houses 120 garments and accessories.

Catwalk footage from Alexander McQueen’s shows plays in the Cabinet of Curiosities, which houses 120 garments and accessories. Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Other cubbies contain only heads. One is topped by a spiky silver crown of thorns. Another features turkey feathers painted to resemble crimson butterflies. It was created by milliner Philip Treacy for McQueen, who seemingly never met a bird he didn’t want to pluck.

In one black box, a pair of lace-stockinged legs stand at attention, while across the room, high up on a shelf, a torso is saddled with an aluminum dinosaur-like spine.

Do ponder McQueen’s True Mission

One wonders if this was how McQueen saw his models: a mere assortment of body parts to be trussed in bondage-wear and bent to his will. Or perhaps, as some of the exhibit’s verbiage suggests, he really did believe in fashion as a “metamorphosis…a transformational medium.”

Maybe, in his own subversive way, McQueen was actually trying to free the feral fecundity of the female form. His last fully realized collection, “Plato’s Atlantis” from 2010, could be construed to support that theory.

At “Savage Beauty,” this collection is represented by seven streamlined silver figures with pointed horns, standing sentry on a white platform. Each is attired in a short, bodice-hugging dress that billows outward at the hips, made of fabric imprinted with patterns inspired by snakes, moths, jellyfish and coral.

The Plato’s Atlantis gallery at London’s V&A sets Alexander McQueen’s otherworldly designs against a backdrop of theatrical footage.

The Plato’s Atlantis gallery at London’s V&A sets Alexander McQueen’s otherworldly designs against a backdrop of theatrical footage. Credit: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Behind them, a large screen plays footage of a nude nymph swirling in the water. As the music gathers momentum, subtly segueing from mating whales to tribal drums, her limbs multiply until she becomes a multi-tentacled creature, both powerful and sensual.

Exiting the gallery, I notice one final quote from McQueen, who succumbed to his inner demons when he hanged himself in February 2010 at the age of 40. “There is no way back for me now. I’m going to take you on journeys you’ve never dreamed were possible.”

“Savage Beauty” is a long, strange trip through the mind of a tormented genius. So fasten your seatbelt. It’s a gripping ride.

IF YOU GO

“Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty,” through August 2 at the V&A. £17.50 adults. £10.20 children ages 12-17. Advance booking recommended. http://www.vam.ac.uk

Tourism info: www.visitlondon.com, www.visitengland.com, www.visitbritain.com

3 Comments

  1. Nick DeRocher says:

    Love the Lady Gaga heels. Looks so comfortable.

    • I think I could really get into the masks, Nick. For one thing, nothing else in the show would possibly fit me. Also, they’re just so practical. No make-up? No worries! Sure, I could wear sunglasses, but that would just look weird.

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